Wednesday, February 3, 2010

Cincinnati makeup artistry/ applying foundation; tool talk

foundation application
foundation application by nannobanan on Polyvore.com





How important is your application method and does it really make a difference? What formula you use and how much coverage you are wanting will dictate how you apply it.

For instance, a person who puts on tinted moisturizer probably wants to use her fingertips. It's already quite sheer and basically foolproof. I have also found tinted moisturizer people to be fairly low maintenance as well.

For a traditional liquid foundation, I personally prefer a sponge. I find it gives less coverage than a brush-I might go back with a brush for some one who really needs coverage-say, someone with rosacea, or broken capillaries. But overall, I feel a brush gives more coverage than most people need or want. I adore the beauty blender because it has a great shape to get into nooks a crannies and is super dense-it doesn't eat up all your expensive product. But on clients I use high quality, disposable, non-latex ones that I buy in bulk-much more hygenic.

There is a lot of hype with "spray' type foundation-I see Carmindy use them all the time-but if you are still using a sponge with it, what is the point? A gimmick, if you ask me.

The new "roller" foundation-really-? I mean, it's awesome- if your face is FLAT. It makes me so mad when companies put grbage like this on the market. How on earth do they think you are going to get that anywhere like around the nose-?

As for the new, "at home" airbrush system-it looks amazing but incredibly high maintenance. The system is $225 and the pods you snap on to spray out product are $55 each. So it is a substantial investment!
One pet peeve I have is when companies claim their foundation gives "an airbrushed finish". The only thing that gives an airbrushed finish is AIRBRUSH. The application is such a fine, pixillated mist. The difference between airbrushed foundation and traditional is much like the difference between regular television and HD TV. Your result feels sheer, appears natural, but there is full coverage.
Summary: to each her own with coverage; roller and spray foundations=marketing ploy; at home airbrush=awesome but pricey. Most of us can get a very nice result with a good, high-pigmented liquid foundation and a trusty sponge, good lighting, and judicious blending.

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